Phil Hansen Gives Exclusive Preview of Virtual “Embrace the Shake”

Phil Hansen, creativity and innovation keynote speaker, collaboration art, overcoming limitations

With the current uncertainty in the world due to the Coronavirus, virtual presentations are the new normal for the speaking industry. Speakers are putting together online workshops, webinars, master classes and more to help spread their message during these unprecedented times. Last week, Phil Hansen presented an exclusive preview of his virtual presentation for Eagles Talent Speakers Bureau and friends. Phil has an inspiring story about how changing your mindset can open a whole new world of possibilities. Being an artist, he also provides ample ideas for innovation and creativity. He could be used to help inspire your team as a whole or to help inspire individuals to be their best creative selves and help them to translate that creativity into the workplace. 

Phil began taking art classes in high school. He quickly developed a love for a style of art known as pointillism. Pointillism is an art style that involves using a large amount of small dots to create an image. Phil became obsessed with this art style and began to practice it constantly. Over some time, the tedious nature of pointillism began to take a toll on the nerves in his hand. He began to develop a tremor and eventually got to the point where it was difficult to hold anything. This was devastating for Phil. It led him to quit art all together for a while. 

A few years later, with the encouragement of a friend, Phil decided to seek out the help of a neurologist about the shaking in his hand. The doctor gave him the heartbreaking diagnoses of permanent nerve damage but then told Phil he should learn how to “embrace the shake.” At first, the diagnosis was extremely disappointing, he wanted a solution to the problem, not to embrace it. After some time to think about “embracing the shake,” Phil began a new approach to art. He started to experiment with different ways to make art using a large variety of different objects including (but of course not limited to) his feet, worms, and a blow torch. He was able to develop a whole new approach to creativity and that new approach changed his opportunities and his options. 

Phil realized that the tremor in his hand was not a roadblock in his career, but rather, an opportunity to expand. He quickly learned that limitations drive creativity. Once Phil began his new art journey, he realized that most creative he was was within the confines of his own mind. He then got the idea to start giving himself even more boundaries and found different places for creative exploration. 

During the virtual keynote, Phil discusses three modes of creativity that can be used to solve problems. First is spontaneous, comparable to that “a-ha moment” we all have sometimes. Second is contemplated, when you sit down and think of an idea and try to come up with possible solutions. Third is something that Phil calls systematic creativity. This is when you take the challenge at hand and break it down to different and smaller parts. This helps you to be more able to analyze and think about it in a much different way. 

To help explain systematic creativity better, Phil leads the audience in a small art project. Phil also encourages the audience to ask him questions via the website sli.do. He answers the questions live during the presentation, helping to engage the audience from beginning to end. In addition to his inspiring message, Phil can also help you to think in a more creative way, which can sometimes be more productive than approaching something logically. Phil offers his presentation either live or prerecorded. In addition to a virtual keynote, Phil also offers a set of four 30 minute workshops for leadership/management members and/or four pre-recorded inspiring, creative messages to help kickstart ideas for internal meetings. Interested? Click here to book Phil for a virtual keynote today. 

 

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